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Google to feature rugged frame complete with foldable design, water-resistance to next Glass

Latest Update: July 24, 2015 | 151 Views
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NEW DELHI: Google may give Google Glass a slight design makeover. A new report suggests the next version of the wearable will feature a more rugged frame complete with a foldable design and water-resistance. Other than the rumored design changes, the new Glass won’t look much different from the current Explorer Edition.

Google Glass 2.0 was made for business

Google Glass’s Enterprise Edition keeps a few features the original version had: a stretchy band fitting across the forehead, computer tech in a compartment located on the frame’s right side, and a tiny display in front of the right eye. One of the most important things to know about Google Glass for enterprise is that it won’t be designed as a stylish accessory. Google created a device to wear in medical centers or factories.
Google Glass Enterprise to come with industry-friendly features

Tony Fadell and his team at Google made serious considerations about the design and function of the next Google Glass. 9-to-5 Google’s Stephen Hall explained, “The overall design of the computer side is more robust as well, built to withstand normal drops and bumps that could occur in less-than-ideal workplace environments. Sources have also said that the device is more water resistant, built with fewer places for water and other outside material to seep in.”

The device also includes improved internals such as 5 GHz support, a better battery, heat management, a larger prism display, and an Intel Corporation (NASDAQ:INTC) Atom processor.

It was recently announced that Google would exclusively market the new wearable to businesses. The device won’t be available for sale at retail stores, nor will it be marketed to all consumers. Google is taking a different approach with its upcoming product. Earlier this year, Google executive Astro Teller admitted that his company made the mistake of misleading consumers when marketing the product. He explained, “We did things which encouraged people to think of this as a finished product.”