World’s largest passenger plane Emirates A380 lands at New Islamabad Airport

Web Desk: World’s largest passenger plane Emirates’ special one-off A380 flight landed in Islamabad on Sunday with celebrities, officials, diplomats and journalists on board.

Advertisement

Arrival of the airline’s iconic double-decker special flight EK2524/EK2525 to Islamabad also made history in Pakistan’s aviation as it was the first A380 to have ever landed in Pakistan.

A380 is a double-deck, wide-body, four-engine jet airliner manufactured by European manufacturer Airbus.

Speaking at the reception at Islamabad airport, Pakistan’s Aviation Minister General (retired) Naeem Khalid Lodhi said that it was a great day for Pakistan’s aviation history.

“Now we have the airport which can receive all kinds of aircraft and we will ask other countries as well to start flights to Islamabad,” he added.

The Emirates A380 aircraft on this special one-off service is in a two-class configuration offering spacious seats in Economy Class and fully flatbed seats in Business Class as well as Emirates’ popular Onboard Lounge.

Passengers in all classes enjoy free Wi-Fi to stay in touch with family and friends besides Emirates “ICE” in-flight entertainment with up to 3,500 channels of movies, TV programmes, music and podcasts.

Two Emirates alumni pilots including Captain Ejazul Haq and Captain Fazle Ghani, who operated the first ever Emirates flight from Dubai to Karachi on October 25, 1985 were also among the guests on board. Captain Haq had operated the second Emirates flight from Dubai to Mumbai on the same day.

It is pertinent to mention here that not all airports in the world can handle Airbus A380 as it needs a special runway and technical handling equipment. In Pakistan, New Islamabad Airport is the first airport to accommodate the largest passenger plane in the country.

The Airport was inaugurated by then Prime Minister of Pakistan Shahid Khaqan Abbais on May 01.

The new Islamabad airport, which has the capacity to handle 15 million passengers annually and space for further expansion, was first suggested in the 1980s.

Advertisement